Friday, September 25, 2015

Hounskull Visor and Camail Padding Work

The padding added under the camail; only the area where the padding meets the mail opening at the chin was stitched. The cuffs of the leather gloves have been folded inside the gauntlet cuff - it adds to the padding of that area.
Thanks to Paul F. Walker, who's marvelous site on Medieval armor, Armour Illustrations, I lately stumbled upon in my quest to keep my visor in the raised position when not needing to be down, I was able to do just that. Paul, as some of you may already have known is a subject matter expert on Medieval armor. He not only lectures on the subject, but has also written a book on it called History of Armour 1100-1700. He's a fine illustrator too. Anyway, Paul kindly answered my post on his blog asking about the visor issue. He immediately responded with what turned out to be a deceptively simple process. He advised me to remove the pins holding the visor, and replace them with nuts and bolts tightened enough to allow the visor to remain and still able to be pushed down. Luckily I already had a Dremel and a metal cutting attachment. This worked perfectly and only needed a little help of a Phillips headed screw driver and hammer to pop out.
WIP shot with the white arrow inside the bascinet showing where the flattened end of the pin was sheared off; the black arrow points to the remainder of the pin popped out of the bascinet.
I may enlarge the holes of the visor and hinges and replace the smaller bolts with larger diameter ones, as the smaller ones have trouble holding up the weight of the visor, but here it is held precariously up.
That's my mom's satin Las Vegas windbreaker she got a while back as a prize; it's a stand-in for a padded gambeson.
The camail fits really good now with the padded liner added - the padding sits snugly at the chin and the mail spreads out over the shoulders cleanly.
I'm waiting on a hand-and-a-half bastard sword I won off ebay for $24.50USD free shipping. It's made
 in China and would likely break in combat, but it'll be good for swinging around the backyard. I'll probably grind off the sharpened edge to make it safer too; after I cut some branches off trees.

22 comments:

  1. Looking Good Dean, not wishing to forward your demise but that is a very good effigy pose you're striking there. Re: the visor up problem, could you not have peened the existing rivets over rather than replacing with a bolt?
    Regards HGA.

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    1. Thanks, HGA! As far as peening the old rivets, possibly so, but now there's even an option to use wingnuts - it could be my identity...Sir Wingnut :) Warm regards, Dean

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    2. Got to stay in character :)

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  2. Looking really cool there Dean!

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    1. Lol! Thanks, Rodger. Just goofing around a bit. Best, Dean

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  3. Dean, you're slowly turning into quite the medieval smithy :0) Very cool stuff indeed. I'm projecting full body armor within 12 months. You're already pot-committed, go All-in now...

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    1. Thanks, Soren. There's some limb armor on ebay for quite a decent price - but, I'm afraid the sizing would be off - they're all "one size fits all." Warm regards, Dean

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    1. Appreciate the sentiment, Phil! Regards, Dean

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  5. I love the idea of you doing some garden clearing with this on Dean, just wonderful.

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    1. It'll be interesting seeing how well the blade is balanced too. Best, Dean

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  6. You look awesome shall look forward to seeing poses with your choppy choppy toy when it arrives :D

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    1. Thanks, Simon. Hopefully it'll be sturdy enough and not just a display piece. Warm regards, Dean

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  7. This really does look the part Dean, well done!

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    1. Thanks, Sander! Nice to have period replicas. Warm regards, Dean

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  8. A great release.
    I have followed very interesting this beginning the work progress
    Looks very presentable outcome, who these padding "crowned"
    :) also "Sir Wingnut" seems very contented....

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    1. Thanks, MM! Appreciate your visit and kind words. Warm regards, Dean

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  9. Hi Dean Glad to see you are altering the fixings on your visor. Simple nut and bolt to use is a flat headed coach bolt like the one here. Square section keeps the bolt in place and stops it from turning when you tighten the nut. when its all fixed you can use your dremel to cut the exess thread off. To give your bolt head a bit of a medieval feel you can file four little sections around the circumference making it look more like a round cross. Keep up the good work you will soon have some nice Kit. http://www.tridenttowing.co.uk/images/m6-x-50mm-coach-bolt-p8541-2796_image.jpg

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    1. Thanks again, Paul. I will give that type of bolt a try, as the one I currently use does loosen after the visor is moved; even with the lock washers. Warm Regards, Dean

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  10. Dean during this period knights could wear what was called stud and splint armour on their arms and legs. This type of armour can be made quite easily if you can get hold of some thickish leather. (Old school satchels) and some steel. Car repair shops sometimes sell mild steel plates. Then you will need rivets. a drill and a hammer. here is a link to a painting I did of this type of armour on my Pinterest page. https://www.pinterest.com/pin/555490935265955325/

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    1. Thanks for dropping by and providing more great ideas, and inspiration, Paul. I do like not only the look of splinted/studded armor, but would think they could be made to fit limbs easier than solid plate. Would still need cops for the knees and elbows. I have seen these available separately. Warm Regards, Dean

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