Monday, December 29, 2014

Aymer de Valence, 2nd Earl of Pembroke

Here is another figure from the FireForge Mounted MAA set - painted up as Aymer de Valence, the 2nd Earl of Pembroke. He served under both Edward I and Edward II in Flanders and Scotland. He defeated Robert the Bruce at the Battle of Methven in 1306.
He tried to keep the peace between Edward II and his opponents headed by Thomas of Lancaster. When Edward's hated favorite Piers Gaveston was exiled and later returned to England, it was Aymer de Valence who captured him. Lancaster had Gaveston removed from his charge and executed. This breach of protocol seriously damaged the relationship between De Valence and Lancaster.
The Earl was at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314, where he led Edward II to safety after the English defeat. A few years later while on a papal embassy he was captured and released after paying a financially ruinous ransom. In 1324, he was in France on diplomatic mission when he collapsed and died, possibly of a heart attack. However, some say he may have been murdered as retribution for his role in the execution of Thomas of Lancaster in 1322 for treason.
Those red blotches about his arms are supposed to be little birdies - or martlets in heraldic terms. The mail is rather nicely sculpted too.
Although I had mentioned in the previous post that those mounted yeomen would be my last painting project for the year, I felt compelled to paint Aymer up as I really like his arms.
I painted up a 120mm Velinden knight in the same arms some years ago. The colors and pattern are simple yet striking.

38 comments:

  1. Dean, how did you ever manage to paint those stripes so uniformly perfect?

    Brilliant!

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    1. Thanks, Jonathan! The stripes aren't too hard if you move the brush tip along - that is, not stopping or slowing down while making them. Warm regards, Dean

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  2. Very nice work Dean you've done a good job of a tricky subject :)

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    1. Thanks, Scott. Appreciate the nice. Dean

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  3. Excellent! Stunning figure Dean!

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  4. That 120mm figure is stunning. To you those stripes are simple, but to me they are a difficult thing to paint and you do it so well.

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    1. Thank you kindly. Anne. Appreciate the visit and nice comments. Regards, Dean

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  5. Once again a tremendous piece of work Dean, the detailing is simply stunning!

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    1. Thanks so much, Michael. Best, Dean

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    1. Thank you again, Mike! Regards, Dean

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  7. Masterful work Dean, love that Verlinden model - how did you find painting the Fire-Forge mini compared to the other recent work in 28mm for your collection?

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    1. Thank you kindly, Soren. Well, I do like the details on the FF figures - the faces, horses and mail are very nicely sculpted. They are also a good match in size with most 28mm - like Perry and BTD. However, I kind of like the size of the GW Bretonnians for painting the heraldry :)! Warm regards, Dean

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  8. I always look for to your new posts in this Period Dean, great figures and history! Love the big guys to.

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    1. Appreciate the kind words, Paul. Warm regards, Dean

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  9. Very nice work Dean! He will stand out!

    Christopher

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    1. Thanks, Christopher! Happy New Year too. Dean

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  10. Lovely Dean! Great painting, and a great story. Happy New Year in advance!

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  11. Dean, you are an amazing artist. There is nothing I can say apart from agreeing emphatically with all the previous comments - and surely with all the following ones :) Thanks for sharing! Cheers!

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    1. Thank you very much again for your very kind words! Warm regards and wishing you a great 2015. Dean

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  12. Very nice work, Dean. I'm looking forward to seeing your excellent Lion Rampant force some day - perhaps at Drumbeat?

    I've decided to paint my many Old Glory medievals using the patented Dean Motoyama MinWax method. I want to get a lot of figures done fast and yours always look so good, there must be something in it.

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    1. Thanks, David! Lol - I cannot take credit for the Minwax staining method - it existed long before, but I surely do like it! I think Drumbeat sounds very enticing - missed out on the last one. Happy New Year! Dean

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  13. Lovely work as always Dean. I echo the above comments about the stripes - you really have done those perfectly.

    Best wishes,
    Jason

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    1. Thank you very much, Jason. Happy New Year too! Dean

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  14. More brilliant work! The stripes are indeed stunning to look at. Say what you will about Napoleonics-the HYW fellows knew how to bring color to the battlefield as well. ;-)

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    1. Thanks again, Monty. I'm think the period was a contrast between the pageantry of the upper class and the squalor and grunginess of the peasantry. As the line goes, "It's good to be the king" :)! Best, Dean

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  15. Dean, what a great piece to end the year on! The painting and history are both superb, with your work on the strips and martlets being excellent. The 120mm knight is also outstanding.

    Cheers, Ross

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    1. Thank you very much, Ross. And wishing you a great 2015!

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  16. Goodness, that's some wonderfully tidy work Dean. I hate painting stripes. Maybe I'll just send mine to you :-)

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    1. Thanks, Michael! Your kind words are much appreciated. Happy 2015! Dean

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  17. Another fantastic job, love these colors Dean!

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  18. The heraldy is perfectly done! Not only the stripes but also teh shading in them!

    Greetings
    Peter

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